Watch: Mercury Makes Rare ‘Transit’ Across Sun


watch:-mercury-makes-rare-‘transit’-across-sun

Skip to content

Planet’s next passage across sun set for 2032

On Monday, 11 November it will be possible to witness a rare astronomical phenomenon – on this day, Mercury is set to make a transit across the sun.

Live feed of the planet Mercury making a rare transit across the surface of the sun on Monday, November 11, from various positions across the globe including the Teide and Roque de los Muchachos Observatories in Spain.

Mercury will cross in front of the sun on 11 November, but don’t expect any barnyard animals to worry about the sky falling: the planet is 190 times smaller than the visible size of the Sun. The passage will last for seven hours. But try not to look at it.

That’s all, folks! Mercury has left the disk of the Sun, completing the transit. The next Mercury transit is in 2032 — so in the meantime, you can read up on @NASAUniverse‘s TESS mission, which uses transits in other star systems to look for exoplanets! https://t.co/2NlnHKzBFn pic.twitter.com/zRLdYnHiaz

— NASA Sun & Space (@NASASun) November 11, 2019

According to the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), however, looking at the celestial event with a telescope is an incredibly foolish thing to do and could result in blindness.

NASA adds that Mercury transits occur only 13 times every century; the next passage of Mercury across the Sun will happen in 2032.

The only places on the planet where this astronomical phenomenon can’t be ‘seen’ are Australia and most parts of Asia and Alaska.


The Fallacy Of Public Education


Dr. Nick Begich breaks down the fallacy of the government training institutions where we are compelled to send our children.

By the way, upgrade your smile with the new SuperSilver Whitening Toothpaste that’s on sale now!


Scientists further refine how quickly the universe is expanding

Researchers Produce Hydrogen From Sea Water in 'Clean Energy' Breakthrough


Previous Major Fire Rocks Planned Asylum Center
Next Moment Second World War plane drops 750,000 poppies over White Cliffs of Dover

MENU

Back
shares